Tuesday, 14 September 2010

More rememberings

Hello my dear friends, I am feeling very warm towards you all - what a lovely bunch of kind, friendly supportive people you are. As this is post 201 I am feeling very privileged to have joined the 'gang'. (Post 200 sneaked up on me as a 'draft') and want to say thank you for being out there.

I have been having quite a creative few days despite having over done it on the plums (I'll say no more) But no one else seems to be eating them!! So shortly I hope to be sharing some completed pieces with you.
Meanwhile I have also finished another section in my Norfolk memories book. I was stirred to catch a Radio 4 programme called 'Looking for the Singing Postman' which brought back all sorts of memories of my Norfolk relatives and their wonderful accent. When of the interviewees coined this phrase as a test of your Norfolkian knowledge which I shall attempt to write phonetically, I really had to smile, the answer came straight back to me.
     "Dar yar far keep a dicky bor?
I shall be interested if any of you know the answer.
My great aunt, grandmother's sister, Auntie Rosie was a Ladies Companion and when in London way back I know not when, was asked this by a London Bobby who recognised her accent and she was able to snap back the answer as quick as lightning which caused great mirth to the policeman in question and Auntie Rosie who liked to tell the tale. (Translation and answer with next post).
When you see the map below you will understand that in the years that followed 1958 we drove along the Norfolk Coast Road many,  many times. Through the wonders of Google Earth I have been virtually travelling this road and have been able to follow some of the tracks up to the dunes where we so often parked including the descriptively named "Cart Gap Road". I have also been able to virtually drive up  the road past 7 Langley which is now completely changed and see the other buildings I recognise. I hope it won't be too long before I can go in reality. Meanwhile I hope you enjoy my next instalment.






16 comments:

marigold jam said...

Third time lucky perhaps - my comments keep ending up with a Service Unavailable Error 503 message and then disappearing! So keep it brief - loved your post - illustrations really make it.

Jane

marigold jam said...

Wouldn't you know it worked this time! I had said in my previous attempts that I remember having a woollen swimsuit which my mother lengthened by knitting a band along the top so it lasted for several years - ugh horrid tickly thing! Remember Lowestoft too from when we lived in Southwold - a real blast of the past you gave me here.

Jane

Rita said...

Enchanting read! Loved it!! :):)

Menopausal musing said...

Such beautiful illustrations! You have a very individual style......lovely, lovely memories to sit and read...... Thank you.

Leenie said...

Priceless memories. We think that whatever time and place we are experiencing will always be there so we don't bother to savor or save--only to find it all faded and gone so fast. Your memories will be brilliant and wonderful for a long. long time!

Love the thought of riding to the beach in a sidecar. What freedom that must have meant!

Lalabibaby @ Dreaming of The Simple Life said...

What a heart warming post Jill and I won't ask about the plums ;-)

Your illustrations are fabulous and bring the words to life .... reminds me of our holidays with the grandparents, cockling at St Osyth, the shingle on the beach at Felixstowe and visiting Lowestoft too. I can remember grandma cooking the cockles in a big pan on a tiny gas ring back at the caravan and we sat listening to them pop!

flutterbycrafter said...

Fabulous illustrations and text, really enjoyed reading it, you are so artistic, I've been enjoying the plumbs too, lol.

Jane said...

Lovely memories Jill, brought 1950's seaside back so vividly - except our's was either West Country or Essex, and wonderful illustrations. I can almost taste the fish and chips! Those knitted swimsuits were horrid - ended up aronud your knees when wet - thought the shirred elastic ones weren't without peril if you got water logged!
We had a neighbour from Norfolk when we lived in Essex so I know the question and answer as we were frequently teased by it - as we still had broad Bristolian accents at the time, he thought it was hilarious to get us to say it!

Heloise said...

What a fascinating and beautifully illustrated piece. I so enjoyed reading it.

Ticking stripes said...

Just delightful!

webb said...

I love the picture of daisy chain over the holes - so, who didn't have that? And I love it that you and both went to the Norfolk coast - well, different continents, but what's that matter? A lovely memoir.

Printed Material said...

Jill,
Cathy is right. You have a style that's all your own. It's a delight to read these memories and share in them. I remember the singing postman. I used to see him on the telly when I was a child and never understood why my Dad thought it so hilarious. Lesley

harmony and rosie said...

It's wonderful and your illustrations are FANTASTIC. x

Linda said...

Jill you are amazing....these memories plus the fantastic illustrations make perfect reading (especially for us ladies of a similar age :-)
I especially love your chish and fips drawing - you've made me want some.
X

Chrissie said...

Beautifully illustrated and I certainly remember that marram grass which stung your legs when you ran down through the dunes to the beach. We had ruched swimsuits, plus a cardi which was boiled and wringered to matted extinction, but it kept the cold North Sea winds out!

Joy said...

Oh, your artwork is such a delight, such an absolute treat and feast for the eyes!! I just love it! Haven't read the story yet, but will... was too enthralled by the drawings and color!